Frequently Asked Questions

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Q:
Where are you located?
A:
Our address is 2400 State Hwy 69, New Glarus, WI, 53574. You may also find directions to our Hilltop Brewery in 'Our Town' (#7 New Glarus Brewing Company).
Q:
What are your hours?
A:
Office hours: Monday - Friday 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Gift Shop: Monday - Sunday 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Tours & Tastings: Monday - Sunday 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
*Of course we will be closed on all major holidays so our employees can spend time with their families.*
At this time we do not accept bus tours.
Q:
Can children/teenagers visit the brewery?
A:
Yes. However, anyone, regardless of age, who cries, spits, screams, fights or climbs on the machinery will politely be excused from our brewery tour.
Q:
Can I order beer directly from you?
A:
Unfortunately we are not permitted to ship beer directly to our customers.
Q:
Where can I get your beer at?
A:
Wisconsin! Sorry about the limited distribution, non-Wisconsinites. There are only so many hours in the day to make beer and we can only keep up with the local demand. However, we would love it if you would stop by our little gift shop and pick some up.
Q:
Do you have a restaurant?
A:
No, however there are many great restaurants in New Glarus.
Q:
Are there any employment opportunities available within your company?
A:
We are always looking for good people. You can stop in anytime and pick up an application in our Gift Shop or click on our employment link for a printable version.
Q:
Do you have a catalog or online store where I can order merchandise?
A:
Yes. Order now and come back again soon.
Q:
Why are the prices in your Gift Shop more than what they are in the stores?
A:
We price the beer in the gift shop at our regularly suggested retail pricing. Here we focus on beer quality and consider ourselves to be agricultural manufacturers, not retailers. It is a fact that we only sell a very small amount of our yearly production through our gift shop (about 3%). With that in mind, it is vitally important that we do not undercut the Wisconsin retailers who support our brewery with shelf space and great pricing everyday.
Q:
Does New Glarus Brewing Co. use high fructose corn syrup in Spotted Cow?
A:
No. We have, and always will, strive to make pure and honest beers for our friends in Wisconsin. We use corn (not high fructose corn syrup) in the Spotted Cow to reflect Wisconsin, as there is a lot of corn grown in our area. Traditional brewers have always used indigenous ingredients in their beer. Our process reflects our countryside. Most of our beers are made with 100% barley and wheat malt, but (as the label states) Spotted Cow does have a touch of corn. Because we buy so much malt and so little corn, corn is more expensive for us. We do NOT use high fructose corn syrup. That is used in soda pop, not beer.
Q:
Why does New Glarus Brewing Co. support Universal Healthcare?
A:
Deb is a supporter of Universal Healthcare because she knows what it’s like to be poor. And not the kind of poor that you might have to buy a Gateway computer instead of the new imac, or the kind of poor in which you have to choose to buy Gap instead of Louis Vuitton, or even the kind of poor that you might just have to wait for these items to go on sale before buying them… I mean the kind of poor that makes you choose between eating and getting medicine for an ear-infection. The kind of poor that only allows you to buy second-hand clothes on sale. And it’s not because she doesn't work hard. She is one of the hardest working women I know, which is probably the reason that she was the first woman to start and run a brewery in the US. The reason that she supports universal health care is because she believes, and knows, that despite how hard you work, a lot of what you have access to (be it health care, food, education, and the like) depends a lot on who you were born to.

Either your parents have enough money to feed you every day or they send you to work after school at 16 to help pay the bills. Either your parents have enough money to pay for your health care, or they don’t eat (or eat mac & cheese) for a few months to cover the cost of your antibiotics from the bug you picked up at school. Many don't know what this is like, and have had a great many opportunities shown to them. That is one of the greatest gifts that a person can get. However, for those out there who aren’t as fortunate, universal healthcare could mean the difference between eating and not, being sick or not, and dying or not. And no one wants to see their taxes go up. But (I would hope) no one wants to see a sick kid not get help because his parents can’t afford it either. I don’t speak for Deb, but I do speak to her love of people, regardless of stature, education, or inheritance. The reason she supports this is to help people.

New Glarus Brewing Co. already gives their employees healthcare coverage, because we realize how important it is. We believe that it is the responsibility of companies to provide care for the employees who may very well spend their entire lives helping to make that business successful, and paying for healthcare is a very small price to pay in the grand scheme of things.

If you live in Wisconsin you can call your local representative to let them know your stance on healthcare reform;

http://legis.wisconsin.gov/w3asp/contact/legislatorslist.aspx?house=assembly
Q:
Why does the Unplugged 'Old English Porter' Taste Sour?
A:
An intense vinegar like sourness is correct for this beer style. This was what Porters tasted like in the 1870's. Our beer is based on the research of the Beer Historian, Graham Wheeler (a noted English Beer Historian).

Mr. Wheeler describes the original Porters as:

"... the least understood of the old British beers. The subject (of the Porter Beer Style) is complicated and confused because porter’s heyday lasted from about 1700 to the pale ale revolution of the mid 1800’s. During that time it passed through many transformations. Porter was simply a mixture of two brown beers. The only characteristic that set the porter apart from any other beer of the day was that porter was deliberately soured by adding a percentage of sour beer to freshly brewed beer. The original porters were not, as is commonly supposed, jet-black in colour, but a translucent brown. They had a rich, smoky flavor derived from the use of brown malt and a winey aftertang produced by the deliberate souring, highly regarded by Londoners."

If you are interested in further information on this, you might want to read 'Wheeler's Porter' at; http://hbd.org/hbd/archive/2116.html#2116-3.

This is a historic beer style. So in the early 1900's when men still unloaded train cars they wanted something thirst-quenching, and beer is generally rather sweet. This was before soda was generally available and fruit juice required squeezing. The Porters (those hard-workers!) really enjoyed the sour aspects of this beer style and that is why this beer style is referred to as a 'Porter' and it is definitely sour.
Q:
Does Beer Spoil going from Cold to Warm Storage or Vice Versa?
A:
In a word ‘No’. I‘ve heard the Urban Legend that “cold beer should never get warm” and I believe it originated years ago in an East Coast Brewer’s advertising campaign. Don’t believe everything somebody tells you…. especially if it’s on TV! It’s OK to buy a six pack out of the cooler and drive it home… even if you live out of state. When you get home store it in the refrigerator or any clean, dry, cool place. Beer stored in a cool dry place will stay fresh longer than beer stored warm. A well made beer can go from warm to cool many times and still taste great. Of course, keep it away from direct sunlight, don’t let it freeze, try not to cook it in your trunk. Fresh beer has that crisp, refreshing character we all know and love. Most beers don’t improve with age, so only buy enough to last a month or two. Lastly, there’s nothing harmful in old beer, it just doesn’t taste the way the brewer intended.
Q:
What is the sediment in my bottle of Spotted Cow?
A:
Spotted Cow is one of our unfiltered brews, which simply means that the brewer's yeast is still in it. Brewer's yeast is full of wonderful vitamins and minerals, and adds the final layer of character that is intended for this brew. It is full of Vitamin B and potassium, and also contributes to a smooth mouth feel and great bready notes! The brewer's yeast will sometimes settle at the bottom of bottles that have stood upright and stationary for a time while waiting to get to you (either during transportation or while waiting for you at your local establishment), and it is always a good idea to reincorporate the brewer's yeast for the vitamins and flavor layers that it adds. To do so, carefully set the bottle on it's side on a flat surface and gently roll the bottle back and forth with the palm of your hand. This should reincorporate all those wonderful flavors!
Q:
Why is Dancing Man so highly carbonated?
A:
All of our Wheat Beers, including Dancing Man, go through a secondary fermentation in the bottle like champagne. Bavarian Style Wheat Beers are by definition highly carbonated and effervescent. They are known for their effusive foam. To minimize foaming when opening a bottle, Dancing Man should be at refrigeration temperature and opened very gently. Then be sure to pour this brew down the side of the glass. Sit back and enjoy the rising bubbles and sparkling taste!
Q:
Why are you switching to the Thumbprint Series?
A:
It is always flattering when less imaginative competitors copy our beers, packaging, and/or marketing. I usually accept this as a personal challenge to do something more. When our trademarked Solstice name was infringed on, I regrouped with Dancing Man. When lots of deconstructed 4 and 6 packs showed up I knew I was doing a good job. When another Midwestern brewer released a "Un*******" series. I thought I can do better.
Thumbprint beers are still brewed with the beer enthusiast in mind. Thumbprint beers are brewed in small batches that are intended to be available for one time only. However, popular demand has caused some styles to return. This is my own thumbprint, to let everyone know this is a real New Glarus handcrafted beer! Cheers.
Q:
How long does beer last?
A:
Beer, like most foods, is best consumed fresh. However the answer to your very good question depends on what you are really asking: Is this beer safe to drink. Will it harm me? This beer is safe to drink. Nothing harmful will grow in beer. Will it taste bad? A well made beer should not spoil so I do not expect this beer to taste sour or “spoiled” What is the Published shelf life for our beer? Six months for the below listed beers What happens to this beer after the “magic six months” As a well made beer ages, like bread, it loses is fine, crisp flavor and aroma. It will become sweeter, bready, like sherry or imported beer. Some people like this flavor. It can be complementary to “malty beers” like Staghorn and Fat Squirrel. However, drinkability will suffer. Drinkability refers to a beer that “drinks easy”. Old beer, especially craft beers, will develop a sediment like old red wine. This is protein and not harmful. Is natural and healthy like the pulp in orange juice. The trick for any good brewer is to brew for as long a shelf life as possible. In the American craft industry we do that naturally with good, old fashion techniques and don’t rely on chemistry like enzymes and antioxidants. Wine is made with added sulfites and other chemicals for this reason. American craft beers are not. That’s why wine and some imported beers can be stored for years on a warm shelf in a liquor store. That’s great for the wine makers and European brewers but gives me a headache ? What’s the bottom line? These beers should be fine. Give it a taste test and let me know what you think. You are the customer and your opinion is worth more than mine! Sincerely, Daniel Carey Brewmaster
Q:
Why is the Berliner Weiss sour?
A:
To answer this we went to Diploma Master Brewery Daniel Carey. He replied, "I did intend to make this beer taste as it does. Our Berliner Weiss is true to style – a light, cloudy, highly carbonated sour wheat beer. In fact, I’m rather proud of it!" Berliner Weiss has been rated as one of the ten best Berliner Weiss Beers in the World. Please check out http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/590/43456 For more information about the style see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berliner_Weisse.
Q:
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A:
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